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20130121
20130129
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KQED (PBS) 37
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English 37
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
and elsewhere around the globe. israelis went to the polls in general elections today. prime minister jet -- prime minister benjamin netanyahu claimed victory after exit polls showed he would likely lead, the government with a narrow majority. our correspondent is in jerusalem with the latest. >> welcome to jerusalem after three months of a lackluster election campaign. suddenly, israeli politics came alive today about an hour before the polls closed. there was growing excitement and speculation. as expected, benjamin netanyahu is likely to lead the next government. he will be the prime minister for the next four years, but it is a weakened prime minister. his coalition did not get the number of seats it wanted. only 31, according to exit polls. that is down from the 42 that the two parties had during the last election. what kind of coalition will be formed? it could be the right and religious parties. that is not what he wants. the television presenter, his party came in second place. he said his party will not expect to be in any coalition. will it be a shaky coalition between the right
to make sure that we move towards free and fair elections so that there is a legitimate post couey election area -- post-coup government. we have got a short-term challenge in restoring their security. the french, i think, in partnership with the military, are doing a great job. there are longer-term challenges, restoring things. this is what led to the rebellion and the coup in the first place. >> do you think they should be deploying drones? >> we have used drones against al qaeda in pakistan, afghanistan, and other places in the world. i think it is incumbent on us in the senate to make sure we have a framework for when and how we're going to approve the use of drones. i do think they are an important tool in our toolkit to fight back against islamic extremists and to take action against folks who have demonstrated to be a real threat to the united states and our regional allies. >> thank you very much for joining us from capitol hill tonight. >> thank you. >> in other news now, senior officials say that leon panetta, the defense secretary, decided to lift a ban about women in c
on the dupont. >> thank you so much. >> rose: we turn now to politics and elections in israel and jordan earlier this week. this comes at a time when the winds of change are sweeping through the middle east. since the start of the arab spring political unrest in jordan has intensified. many groups including the muslim brotherhood boy kod the election with more than half of jordan's registered voters participated. this is part of a series of reforms king abdullah ii has implemented to combat political discents. if israel benjamin netanyahu was granted aid third term as a prime minister in the coalition government but the real winner maybe lapid worst centrist party gain gained substantial ground, joining me is jordan ambassador to the united nation and efraim halevy who served in the israel national security council. i'm pleased to have them both on this program to talk together at this table about important things that are going on in their region including elections, mr. ambassador, thank you for coming. tell me what we read into the jordanian elections and what they tell us about the f
in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimony had been post toned until now. she took responsibility and emsized her commitment to improving diplomat security abroad. >> as i have mentioned many times i take responsibility and nobody is more committed to getting this right. i am determined to leave the state department and our country safer, stronger, and more secure. now, taking responsibility meant moving quickly in those first uncertain hours and days to respond to the immediate crisis, but, also, to further protect our people and posts in high-threat areas across the region and the world. it meant launching an independent investigation to determine exactly what happened in b
elections. he was asked if the president has met his expectations during the first term. >> he has seen the economy come up again, and the employment -- unemployment rate is still too high but i think this will improve. we're out of iraq and we are changing our policy in afghanistan, and osama bin laden is dead. the president has made a commitment to education and he is running with a 52% approval rate, and this is a good start for a second term. >> what about the critics of the president to say that the deficit has grown and he has not put his weight behind climate change. in his first address, he mentioned climate change three times. and there are still problems in the country and the criticism -- is that he has given a fabulous speech but has not followed through. >> i think some of the criticism is fair but you have to also talk about his initial priorities or challenges. he is really committed to doing something about this in the second term. the deficit is one of the most difficult issues and the president -- he does not sign the appropriation bills until they are passed by congre
. we just spent $3 billion on a presidential election and the president's appointees, most of them he makes now are most likely never to get confirmed, unlikely to get debated, certainly unlikely to get discussed and certainly unlikely to serve. >> you want to end the filibuster. what's behind that? >> senator jeff morgan would make it essential that people talk. this is what the american people want. it would encourage debate, it wouldn't push it away. >> what is your reform asking for, demanding next tuesday? >> four things. one, that the majority leader of the senate can put a bill on the floor for discussion and debate. right now he can't do that unless he has 60 votes to do that. he can't even proceed. >> number two. >> number two, nominations. the president makes nominations. there needs to be a clear way for those nominations to get discussed in a short period of time. not 30 hours of senate time, which is more than a week. but in a short period of time, they get discussed and they get a vote on nominations. number three, a conference committee. the house passes one bill. the s
is this is a real imperative. what's new, it also is now an imperative for republicans. the election results from last november made clear the republican party needs a message for latino, asian-americans and immigrant groups if they have any chance of recapturing the white house. >> scott, this is carla marinucci. what's your thoughts on this? we've seen paul ryan, marco rubio extend a hand to president obama so to speak and suggest they are ready to talk about immigration reform. what's the biggest hurdle here? >> well, i think the biggest hurdle in the end is going to be politics, of course, but the issue of citizenship. what marco rubio outlined this week and last weekend is very close to what president obama talked about in 2011. and so i think that will provide some cover for other republicans. when you've got someone like marco rubio, a rising star in the party, paul ryan, saying we're ready to do a deal here, but the devil is in the details as they always say. democrats feel very emboldened on this issue, and they're going to sort of, you know, swing for the fences. they want full legal st
mean, in the weeks after the election, he drew some very clear lines on fiscal cliff, for example. i mean he said, tax rates on wealthy individuals had have to go up. that's a firmer way of approaching these then he sometimes did in the past. >> dan, one of the things that was very different from his first speech is that this speech he didn't appear to talk to republicans. and nor did he reach out to the middle. when we talk about that it was a very -- had a lot of progressive elements in it, they were applause lines that seemed directed right at core democratic constituencies. so who do you think his target audience was? is the country behind him now or is it once again he's just solidified the same base we've come to know the last four years? >> i think he's concluded, and i think it's a fair conclusion, there are voters in this country who will not be with him. years ago or seven or eight years ago, we talked about how democrats were looking for ways to win over rural america. this speech that he gave is an indication that he's not looking to try to win over rural america. there a
that republicans should whine about. he did win the election he's entitled to try this very liberal strategy and see if it succeeds for him and if it's the way to get his agenda through. i tend to have my doubts. we're all going to find out. >> brown: rev. hamilton, by your role you get involved in all the social issues of our time. did you hear the president making a kind of aggressionive statement about, "this is the way forward for all of us" or did you hear him reaching out to embrace people, to help create that? >> i think it's a great question. i wish he had done more to reach out. in fact that was the point of my message today at the national cathedral was to say, you know, we need a new american vision that's not just democratic or not just republican. it has to be a new vision that brings people together. if we had a new vision with key strategic goals that republicans and democrats have crafted together and say this is what we're going to work together over the next ten years, it would have a huge impact on bringing americans together. i wish that he had done more of that >> brown:
on the heels of last year's election in which president obama won seven of every ten hispanic votes in his victory over republican mitt romney. senator john mccain of arizona said that's the key reason his party must now get on board. >> elections. elections. the republican party is losing the support of our hispanic citizens. and we realize that there are many issues in which we think we are in agreement with our hispanic citizens, but this is a preeminent issue with those citizens. >> ifill: mccain also said the country cannot continue to deny citizenship to children brought to the u.s. illegally. president obama has said immigration reform is at the top of his second term agenda. today his spokesman jay carney welcomed the senate agreement. >> this is a big deal. this is an important development. this is in keeping with the principles the president has been espousing for a long time, in keeping with bipartisan efforts in the past, and with the effort this president believes has to end in a law that he can sign. >> ifill: mr. obama is scheduled to unveil his own ideas on immigration refo
-than-expected showing in tuesday's elections. near-final totals showed his bloc and its allies had only 60 of 120 seats in parliament. netanyahu signaled he'll reach out to a new centrist party that made a strong showing. it favors a new focus on making peace with the palestinians. this was election day in jordan. voters cast ballots in the country's first parliamentary elections since the arab spring. the new legislature will have more power, including the ability to choose the next prime minister. some two million people were eligible to go to the polls. turnout estimates varied from a high of 56% to as low as 47% as the day went on. several islamist groups boycotted, saying the election was stacked against them. but the prime minister dismissed their actions. >> ( translated ): the weakness of the turnout, if it exists, and i am not saying that, nobody should think that it is because of the boycott. it is not correct. otherwise anyone would think if there was any hesitation for the elections it's because people were neither convinced with past elections nor with the performance of the past parliamen
and bus ride. and started selling tickets before election day >> there's nothing like being here. i mean i could watch it on television or i could sit in one of the buildings around here and probably look out at it. it's nothing like being in there. kind of like swimming. you can think about the swimming but if you're not in the pool you really can't feel it. >> suarez: for many we spoke to, it wasn't just history but this president that brought them to washington >> we don't think we've had a president like him before or will have one in my lifetime. so it's worth it to be here to pay homage to him and to his beautiful family and to the country that elected him and to the people who elected him. we're just delighted to be a part of this. >> this is history in the making. first of all from an historical perspective who wouldn't want to be here? but more importantly for me, the whole of the obama administration is everything that i hold dear >> suarez: margaret came up with her family from north carolina. for her a second inauguration for the first black president was no less exciting, no l
after tuesday's election. the contest saw a surprisingly strong showing from a centrist party led by a former television personality. margaret warner is in jerusalem. i spoke with her a short time ago. >> so margaret, a few days after the election what kind of government seems to be taking shape? >> jeff, i'm told that bebenetanyahu is trying to put together a very broad coalition, not relying just on the trawl religious and ultra conservative and settler movement crowd that is in his current government. so he is working with that surprise second place finisher to try to put together a very big coalition as well. a lot more votes than they really need. would if the people they're talking about join the government really span a range of viewpoints on everything from how to improve economic conditions for the middle class to say restarting peace talks with the principles. but it will take-- it could take a month to actually firm up. >> tell us a little bit about that surprise second place finisher because it really was a surprise, did get a lot of attention in the leadup. >> warner:
of the world in this election in which he did well with minorities and younger voters so to the extent that his second election ratified the new obama coalition and the new shape of the electorate he so, too, hopes his second term will speak to that. and i think that was an interesting part of this speech but if you're in a republican hearing this when he talks about collective action they hear big government, when he talks about investment they hear taxes and when he talks about takers which he did in the speech, that's a loaded word. it aims right at paul ryan who talked about takers versus makers, the takers being the one who receive federal benefits but pay no federal income tax. that's a shot. that's not just language that's slipped in. so that's the sense in which this had a combative -- there were a few barbs in this speech. >> one of the moments in the campaign when the president was office balance was when he said you didn't build it, talking about small business. that was one of the big themes of the speech saying you need collective action in order to get anything done. again, not ne
netanyahu lost steam? >> this is a very interesting revolution. there's no doubt but this election, in fact with the defeat for netanyahu. >> meaning what? he won the election. >> he may be the next prime minister. his party went down. >> who, yahir? >> no, netanyahu's own party went down from 42 seats to 31 seats. so his party had fewer seats. this guy came out of nowhere. his first time running for office. he got 19 seats. he became the most -- the second most important party in -- out of nowhere. so he has become the star of this thing. and netanyahu is going to have to make a deal with him. all of the politicians are splintered but it's never been like this. now netanyahu is going to have to move, if i may say so, this is now a center right. it is going to be much more pragmatic and open. >> how long is his term? >> five years, isn't it? >> it can be as much as five years but it almost never lasts five years because the coalition breaks up. >> how long do you think he will be prime minister? >> i think the next three years at least. >> what happened to ohlmert? >> in my judgment if he h
two weeks before this backroom betrayal of the public trust by elected officials and the mercenaries they have mentored, amgen pleaded guilty to fraud. fraud, look it up. trickery, cheating, duplicity. amgen agreed to pay $762 million in criminal and civil penalties. the company had been caught illegally marketing another one of its drugs. the fact that their puppet master had been the subject of fines and a massive federal investigation mattered not to its servile pawns in the senate, where pomp and circumstance are but masks for the brute power of money. with me now is congressman peter welch, democrat from vermont. he has just introduced bipartisan legislation to repeal that half-billion-dollar giveaway to amgen. we asked one of its co-sponsors, republican richard hanna of new york, to join us, but a previous commitment made it impossible for him to do so. congressman welch, welcome. >> thank you. >> what is it you're actually trying to do? >> well, there's two things. one, i want to get the taxpayers their money back. this is half a billion dollars, more than that, that is vintag
coming out onto the streets. another half is sitting at home saying there has been an election. our side won. why are you on the streets? the president says give me time. i have had seven months on the job. people say he has had time. they worry about the agenda being pushed. they do not want the state to be made at the beginning. what is difficult to see is how the two sites will be brought together. neither the authorities nor opposition have come up with a clear vision as to how to do that. >> thank you very much. while egyptians are raising their voices two years after rising up against hosni mubarak, in syria, the defiance has not shifted president assad. homs has seen some of the worst fighting. our reporter has returned for this special report. >> some of the heaviest fighting happened here. this neighborhood came to symbolize a brutal conflict. a ferocious government offensive after the opposition, it was an assault on an entire community. after nearly one year, life is slowly returning. rubbish collectors are on the job. a small sign the government is back on the street. some fa
in the media heard were so shocked to discover that we have that twice elected a man of the left. where have they been for these four years? and i would add, 699 speeches, tell prompted speeches that he has given. >> how many did ronald reagan give? with a teleprompter. >> six or seven. [laughter] >> i was lucky enough to be there for all of them. >> the president spoke about selma, civil rights, seneca falls, stonewalled, where the modern gay rights movement was born. the couple of things happen. congress will have an impact on the administration. harry reid and mitch mcconnell of reaching an agreement on the filibuster, nothing profound, but that they will raise the debt ceiling to may 18. how will this impact the presidency? >> what the house did is a sign of what is ahead of us. they have not gone over the defeat from november. they have no leverage. they discovered they have the leverage and now have to wait to back down. this is a face-saving device to kick it down the road until may. the president is in a much stronger position in dealing with the republicans in the house. >> do you a
he says is not often what he does. when was elected on could to thousand eight he said he would pack immigration. i felt a sense of relief because the republican candidates mitt romney really push forward an anti-immigrant agenda. i would like to president obama meet with members of the undocumented community. many of the people who want to see him succeed the most are the people he is not even aware of. >> victor speaking to us there. a problem was so many illegal americans in this country. you are watching abc world news america. still to come, it is a tale of social clubs. what makes "pride and prejudice" so popular 200 years on? queen beatrix has announced she is laying down her crown. she will abdicate in favor of her eldest son in april. >> queen beatrix reigned for 33 years but to just three minutes to thank her loyal subjects for what she called "the beautiful years." >> is inspiring to feel close to people, it to sympathize in grievances and share times of joy and national pride. a handful of three children. in 1980 she took over from her mother to become queen of the kingdo
goodwin. >> i think, i'll take all three of them. >> rose: i know you will. >> the re-election really sert fies the legacy. think if he wasn't elected. maybe obamacare would have been undone in congress. abortion rights might have gone backwards. now we are sure they will not under his administration. con tra ception will be out there. the sense that the country can move in the direction that he was trying to move it which goes back to what we've been saying all along that collective action can produce individual help. might have been shifted in the other direction had he not won. so everything he accomplished i think is multiplied by the fact that he won that reelection. it's human. bigger than it seemed at the time. >> rose: in fact, he has said, in the last several months that this victory was as much, was as important not more important because in fact it was a referendum on what he had done before in the first four year. >> absolutely. >> rose: okay bob i leave it to you to sort of sum up the first term. >> first of all i think the real questions are what has he learned and how
congress makes in its pay can't take effect until after the next election. >> we should not say to a member, "if you think the budget before you is not good for the country, vote against it and you won't get paid. if you think it's not good for the country, you better vote for it because you have a mortgage payment due. >> reporter: senate democrats said they would pass the debt ceiling extension and they also promised to pass a budget which is sure to be very different than the one house republicans produce this spring. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: in the engine that is the global economy, europe continues to be the break. while the u.s. emerging markets and even japan are expected to see slow but study growth this year, the eurozone will shrink for the second year in a row. in an updated prediction, the i.m.f. forecast the global economy to growth 3.5%. that's down slightly from its earlier prediction back in october, thanks in part to the recession continuing in europe. oliveer blargchard joins us. are the policies addressing the recession not working or does it just need
million for the 2014 midterm elections. the n.r.a. is obviously, as you mentioned, going to be adding to their membership, getting more fund raising so this is a battle and a place where they can take out intense positions. >> sreenivasan: how about putting this in terms of perspective in terms of 2014, 2016? even the vice president why he decided to come out on good deal but is on almost a road tour. he seems to be campaigning for both gun rights and gun control or sun safety as well as maybe for himself. >> well, the presidential race, of course, we just inaugurated president obama for his second term. we've seen action shifts to the states. you have democratic governors making moves on this. andrew cuomo in new york is taking the lead. he could run for president. the vice president is not making it secret that he could be running for president as well so he's the front man on this major issue that the president will be talking about. so none of this is without politics in mind. the money does matter, the momentum on this matters when you're talking to different families affected by
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)

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